UI images for the croissant app

An easy to understand insurance quoter experience: Kanetix/Rates.ca

For Kanetix, I was part of a team at Say Yeah that was consulting on creating more intuitive ways for consumers to get comparison quotes on automotive and home insurance products. We helped the team define their new UI and design system for a forthcoming rebrand to Rates.ca, and better align the product with their goals for their internal insurance brokerage.

Client

Timeline

My Role

October 2019-February 2020

Kanetix Ltd: client of Say Yeah!

Matt Rintoul: Director of Product Design

Kate (me): Designer
Product designer working on UI screens and flows

Team

The Challenge

Getting a new insurance plan can be a confusing process for consumers.
How might we encourage users to follow through with  getting a quote and purchasing a plan on Kanetix.ca?

Understanding team objectives

Before diving into user research, we wanted to get a sense of the current educational landscape: what are the current methodologies for teaching children, and where might there be gaps in the traditional educational model?

We conducted secondary research via educator materials and peer-reviewed research to better understand the primary education space.

Key Findings:
Children may not be interested in completing a half finished lesson, or may not be able to leave a lesson incomplete to come back and still learn half way through.
1
Children learn and grow when systems reward process and progress instead of always rewarding the right answers,
2
Visualizations are helpful for symbolizing rewards/success throughout, rather than relying on only audio or text as an indicator
3

Developing a design system

We first determined based on our secondary research that a physical product would help keep children engaged, and incorporate different senses in the experience.

This became our starting point for ideation, alongside a digital component, which was more focused on seeing progress (a key engagement component).

Above is different user needs and corresponding functionality mapped together for our digital product ideation

Refining the user interactions and app language

Before diving into user research, we wanted to get a sense of the current educational landscape: what are the current methodologies for teaching children, and where might there be gaps in the traditional educational model?

We conducted secondary research via educator materials and peer-reviewed research to better understand the primary education space.

Key Findings:
An empathy map to identify parent thoughts and feelings
Above is an empathy map, used to identify parents' needs and pain points in the learning process.

The final outcome

These are some of the mockups created for the digital interface, including home page, other game experiences, and the integrated physical game.
The screens above demonstrate some of the purely-digital experience touch-points: the home page and games page, where children can hold objects up to the webcam to learn the word.
These screens are examples of the visual feedback displayed to users. This feedback depends on their progress in placing blocks into the physical product.
These screens show the beginning and ending states of the interactive story application

Key takeaways & challenges

  • Learning for children differs significantly from adults, as does design for them. We learned that we needed to continually rework the design to ensure messaging was clear, and there was minimal on boarding and set up needed, to retain a child's interest
  • Ideating on integrating a physical & digital product require establishing strong patterns for what points users will give inputs to the system and receive feedback.
  • With physical products, the materials are as important as the functionality of the system: the feel and warmth of the product can do a lot for retaining engagement long-term
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